Estate Planning, Probate & Guardianship

Areas of focus within estate planning, probate and guardianship.

Trusts, Wills & Other Documents

Trusts

Trusts can address and solve a wide variety of estate planning situations through use of various types of trusts.

A trust is a different way of holding property and can be directed to deal with multiple situations. It can separate control over assets from the benefits of owning those assets. The intelligent use of trusts can help you minimize estate tax liability, provide for a favorite charity, plan for the next generation of family business management, or assure the financial security of disabled or vulnerable children. We can advise you about charitable remainder trusts, irrevocable life insurance trusts, special needs trusts, revocable living trusts, or many other trust instruments designed to meet very specific estate planning goals.

Some families will benefit as well from community property agreements, postnuptial or premarital agreements, or other documents that can vary the provisions of Arizona law related to the disposition of property upon divorce or death.

Wills & Other Customary Documents

There are many ways you can benefit from the basic estate planning documents. A proper estate plan allows you to distribute your assets in accordance with your wishes and can prevent misunderstandings and disputes about your intentions. In addition, you are able to select who will be responsible for overseeing your estate administration in probate.

Basic estate planning documents include:

  • Last Will & Testament
  • Financial Power of Attorney
  • Medical Power of Attorney
  • Mental Power of Attorney
  • Living Will

While most people know that a last will and testament is the best way to distribute their estates after you’re gone, parents of minor children can also use their wills to designate their guardian in the event of a catastrophic accident or a conservator for management of a minor’s assets.

You can avoid the need for a guardian and/or a conservator for yourself through the use of medical and financial powers of attorney. These instruments name trusted persons to manage your health care decisions and financial affairs if you become unable to express your own preferences through illness or injury.

The fifth basic instrument is an advance directive to physicians, also known as a living will. This expresses in clear terms the circumstances under which life support should be terminated in case of terminal illness, persistent coma or other extreme medical conditions, thereby removing a difficult burden from your loved ones by clearly stating your medical choices.

Contact Our Team

Margrave Celmins P.C.

8171 E. Indian Bend Road Suite 101
Scottsdale, AZ 85250

(480) 994-2000

(480) 994-2008

Margrave Celmins